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Prevalence of Botulism in the Food Chain of the Lower Great Lakes

Field observations suggest that quagga mussels and other benthic   invertebrates may become infected and/or intoxicated by the presence   of vegetative cells and/or spores of type E Clostridium botulinum in   the sediment immediately beneath or within the mussel beds. The fish   species that feed on the benthic invertebrates then contribute to   the movement of type E toxin up the food chain. The specific   objectives of this New York Sea Grant funded project were to   determine the prevalence of type E C. botulinum in the near shore   sediments; in invertebrates such as quagga mussels; and in fish such   as round gobies, freshwater drum, and smallmouth bass from areas of   the Lower Great Lakes where type E C. botulinum levels are high in   the sediments and invertebrates. The species of fish tested had been   shown in the researchers' previous work to be the most likely   species affected.     The research in 2  4 and 2  5 has been unable to clarify the role   that the benthic food chain may play in the C. botulinum type E   intoxications that have recently struck the live-fish-eating birds   of the Lower Great Lakes. Whether the environmental conditions in   the sediments have changed or the level of C. botulinum type E in   the lakes has declined is unknown at this time. The presence of C.   botulinum type E had been successfully documented in previous years   at the same locations near Dunkirk, NY.    (botulism); (type E); (type E botulism); (C. botulinum); (lower food   chain); (food chain); (food chain transfer); (sediment); (sediment);   (invertebrates); (invertebrate); (quagga mussels); (round goby);   (round gobies); (freshwater drum); (smallmouth bass); (mussels);   (mussel)

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Organism
Impact of Pollutants
Exotic Species
Land Use and Habitat
Shoreline
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Erie
Lake Ontario
State Province
New York
Region Being Monitored
Benthos
Near and OpenShore Waters
Nearshore Terrestrial
Resource Being Monitored
Bottom Sediment
Human Health
Wildlife
Beneficial Use Impairment Assessments
Loss of Fish and Wildlife Habitat
Biology And Life History
Parasites and Diseases
Annex Numbers
Contaminated Sediment
Research & Development
Annex 17
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
General
Monitoring
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Contaminated Sediment
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
    Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components

The Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Research Inventory is an
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up-to-date information about research projects in the
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Region.