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A Water Quality Assessment of the Mona Lake Watershed

The Mona Lake Watershed faces some of the most serious water quality   challenges in west Michigan.  Although the watershed is relatively   small in area (~ 2   km2 or 48,    acres), each of the major water   bodies (Mona Lake, Black Creek, Little Black Creek) suffers from   severe chemical and biological degradation.  Sediments contaminated   with elevated levels of heavy metals and toxic organic chemicals   have   been found in residential and commercial areas of Muskegon Heights,   and both creeks are on the 3 3(d) list in Michigan.  In addition,   Mona Lake remains hypereutrophic and is highly impacted by high   phosphorus loading and nuisance algal blooms.     The objectives of this project were to evaluate the relative sources   of phosphorus to Mona Lake (external vs. internal loading) and   provide current baseline information that will be utilized directly   by local stakeholders and the watershed council to develop a   watershed management plan. In addition to providing data for local   decision making, the proposed project will utilized a methodology   that can serve as a model for the assessment of internal vs.   external   nutrient loadings in a watershed.  This assessment is critical in   determining the source of impacted nutrients, which can help   optimize   resource allocation for surface water improvements.      External P load varied among sub-basins, which was mostly related to   discharge but also to land use. Black Creek, which drains lands with   natural cover and agriculture, accounted for the majority of flow,   as   well as total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)   load, to Mona Lake. However, the relative contribution of SRP load   was greater in Little Black Creek, which flows through a mostly   urbanized sub-basin, than in Black Creek. The relative importance of   internal loading was strongly related to season, as internal TP   loads   contributed 48% of the overall P load in April 2  5 but 82% of the   overall P load in September 2  4. Internal TP and SRP loading was   greater under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. Mean anaerobic TP   release rates ranged from  .8  to 15.56 mg P m-2 d-1, varying with   site and season. Spatial variability in both internal phosphorus   loading and sediment P concentration also was evident. By taking   into   account the spatial and temporal variability of different loading   sources, management practices can be targeted to optimize nutrient   source control strategies. 

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Alan SteinmanPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 9 projects
Rick RediskeResearcher
Associated with 7 projects
Agencies

Funding 12 projects for a total of $720,629.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Physical/Chemical
Impact of Pollutants
Nutrients, Including Phosphorus
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Michigan
State Province
Michigan
Annex Numbers
Contaminated Sediment
Control of Phosphorus
Pollution from Non-Point Sources
Remedial Action Plans and Lakewide Management Plans
Research & Development
Annex 17
Load reduction models for GL System pollutants
Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants
General
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Contaminated Sediment
    Control of Phosphorus
    Pollution from Non-Point Sources
    Remedial Action Plans and Lakewide Management Plans
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Load reduction models for GL System pollutants
    Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
    Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants

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