Skip to main content
hyi
Banner
banner
bn

Lake Huron Sinkholes - Microbial Composition and Processes in Biogeochemical HotspotsBopi A. Biddanda1 and Stephen C. Nold21Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University,Muskegon, MI, USA2Biology Department, University of Wi

        Karst sinkholes discharging groundwater onto the Lake Huron floor  through   Paleozoic bedrock have created unique habitats characterized by steep  environmental   gradients and conspicuous benthic microbial mats and organic-rich  sediments.  These   ecosystems feature high microbial biomass and intense activity -  biogeochemical "Hot   Spots" (Biddanda et al. Ecosystems 9:828-842, 2  6).  We have  identified three sinkhole   communities along a depth gradient in Thunder Bay National Marine  Sanctuary.  The   principal goals of this 2-year (9/ 6-8/ 8) study are to: (1) Describe  the abundance,   diversity and activities of the microbial community in the submerged  sinkhole ecosystems   located along the depth gradient, and (2) Determine how the changing  environmental   gradients in submerged sinkhole ecosystems impact microbial  composition and processes.    Microbial communities are being characterized using molecular  techniques that target   different molecules.  First, membrane lipid profiling is combined with  measurements of   stable carbon isotope (13C) incorporation into individual fatty acids  to provide an   integrated view of community composition and activity.  Second,  genetic diversity profiles   (ARISA) and DNA sequence data provide a high-resolution view of community   composition.  Third, fluorescence microscopy and radioisotopic tracers  are used to directly   assess microbial abundance and growth rates.  We are using these tools  to test the   hypothesis that photosynthesis-dominated microbial communities in  shallow sunlit   sinkholes give way to chemosynthesis-dominated sinkhole communities in  deep aphotic   water.  In these model sinkhole habitats, we will test the hypotheses  about the role of   microbial diversity in determining community function including carbon  flow and nutrient   cycling.  These analyses provide the first detailed picture of  microbial life in sinkhole   ecosystems of the Laurentian Great Lakes.   

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Stephen NoldPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Bopi BiddandaResearcher
Associated with 2 projects
Agencies
National Science Foundation $ 240,000.00USDEstimates

Funding 6 projects for a total of $5,285,249.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Literature / Existing Data
Theoretical
Scale of Phenomena
Biochemical
Cellular
Community
Ecosystem
Organism
Physical/Chemical
Impact of Pollutants
Nutrients, Including Phosphorus
Processes
Natural Ecological Processes
Natural Physical/Geological Processes
Land Use and Habitat
Shoreline
Wetlands
Resource Management
Fisheries
Wildlife
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Huron
State Province
Michigan
Frequency
Monthly
Data Availability
Digital
Geo-referenced
Region Being Monitored
Near and OpenShore Waters
Nearshore Terrestrial
Resource Being Monitored
Groundwater
Hydrologic / Hydrometric / Climatic
Plankton / Microorganisms
Annex Numbers
Pollution from Non-Point Sources
Research & Development
Annex 17
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants
General
Monitoring
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Pollution from Non-Point Sources
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
    Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants

The Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Research Inventory is an
interactive, Internet-based, searchable database created as a tool to collect and disseminate
up-to-date information about research projects in the
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Region.