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Enhancing Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Degradation in Great Lakes Sediment

To explore ways to speed the breakdown of PCBs in the Great Lakes,   researchers will team elemental iron with microscopic organisms that   dechlorinate PCBs in contaminated sediment. Previous studies found   that particular microorganisms in Baltimore Harbor's sediment   degrade PCBs more quickly when corroding iron releases hydrogen gas,   which is food for these microorganisms, into the water. The   researchers anticipate that similar microorganisms live in Lake   Superior's PCB-contaminated sediments and will also respond to iron.   They hope to stimulate PCB dechlorination in less-contaminated   sediments by seeding them with iron and the Baltimore Harbor   microorganisms. Speeding the ability of natural microorganisms to   dechlorinate PCBs might complement or replace expensive and   controversial dredging procedures and increase the ability of   remediation personnel to manage contaminated sediment.

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Paige NovakPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Agencies
Minnesota Sea Grant College Program $ 37,844.00USDEstimates

Funding 30 projects for a total of $2,568,917.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Biochemical
Community
Impact of Pollutants
Toxic Organics
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Superior
State Province
Minnesota
Annex Numbers
Contaminated Sediment
Persistent Toxic Substances
Research & Development
Annex 17
Control technologies for treatment of municipal and industrial effluents/emissions
Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants
Relationship of contaminated sediments on ecosystem health
General
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Contaminated Sediment
    Persistent Toxic Substances
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Control technologies for treatment of municipal and industrial effluents/emissions
    Physical and transformational processes affecting delivery of pollutants
    Relationship of contaminated sediments on ecosystem health

The Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Research Inventory is an
interactive, Internet-based, searchable database created as a tool to collect and disseminate
up-to-date information about research projects in the
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Region.