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SEA LAMPREY MARK TYPE, WOUNDING RATE, AND PARASITE?HOST PREFERENCE AND ABUNDANCE RELATIONSHIPS FOR LAKE TROUT AND OTHER SPECIES IN LAKE ONTARIO

Long-term datasets, seasonal observations, and unique assessment   series make Lake Ontario an important location to study sea lamprey-  host interactions.  Sea lamprey control began in 1971 and lake trout   stocking began in 1973.  Wounding data has been collected for lake   trout in targeted surveys in July and September, in contaminant   surveys in spring and fall, and from monthly community index gill   netting.  Wounding data has been collected for salmon and trout   during angler surveys and fishway monitoring.  These datasets,   coupled with estimates of sea lamprey abundance, will be used to   create a record of the intensity of sea lamprey predation on lake   trout and other species.  Direct estimates of the number of lake   trout killed by sea lampreys, unique in the Great Lakes, were made   during 1982?1992 (Bergstedt and Schneider 1988, Schneider et al.   1996).  Since 1971, substantial contrast in abundances of sea   lampreys and lake trout, and in fishing mortality for lake trout   have been observed.  Recent declines in abundance of adult lake   trout have been accompanied by increases in wounding rates on other   salmonids and a collapse in survey catches of burbot.  We propose to   assemble and use these data to understand the interaction of sea   lampreys with lake trout and other hosts.  The objectives of this   work are: assemble a comprehensive database of wounding observations   on lake trout and other salmonids from Lake Ontario and apply the   Rutter and Bence (2  3) asymptotic wounding rate estimation   procedure to these data;  evaluate seasonal relationships between   healing and fresh wounds and the relationship between these   observations and lake trout mortality rates calculated from   September gill net survey data; evaluate the relationship between   sea lamprey abundance, host abundance, and seasonal wounding rates   on lake trout and other species; compare these relationships to   those between carcasses and wounding rates observed by Schneider et   al. (1996).  Understanding the damage caused by sea lampreys is   critical to defining economic injury level targets and directing sea   lamprey control efforts to best support Fish Community Objectives.    The proposed work will further our understanding of how host   preference and abundance affect sea lamprey attack rates and the   effectiveness of using spring vs. fall wound observations to   estimate sea lamprey parasitism.

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Brian LantryPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Jean AdamsResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Gavin ChristieResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Teodore SchanerResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
James BowlbyResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Michael KeirResearcher
Associated with 2 projects
Jana LantryResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Paul SullivanResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Daniel BishopResearcher
Associated with 1 projects
Agencies
Great Lakes Fishery Commission $ 13,482.00USDEstimates

Funding 54 projects for a total of $5,089,137.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Literature / Existing Data
Scale of Phenomena
Ecosystem
Impact of Pollutants
Exotic Species
Processes
Natural Ecological Processes
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Ontario
State Province
New York
Ontario
Biology And Life History
Population Dynamics
Ecosystem Effects
Predator / Prey Interactions
Annex Numbers
Research & Development
Annex 17
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
General
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats

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