Skip to main content
hyi
Banner
banner
bn

Fish Ecology and Ecosystem Forecasting of the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay

Fishery managers in the Great Lakes and coastal marine systems need   to be able to make predictions as they attempt to manage fisheries   in ecosystems that are constantly changing. Problems such as habitat   loss, eutrophication, non-indigenous species invasions, and climate   change all pose challenges to making the predictions that are needed   in fishery management scenarios. For example, in the Great Lakes,  recent changes in the benthic community, particularly the invasion   by Dreissena mussels and subsequent decline of Diporeia, have been   tied to changes in planktivorous fish distribution and abundance.   The invasion of the predatory zooplanktors, Bythotrephes longimanus   and Cercopagis pengoi may be affecting fish diet selectivity and   zooplankton availability. Changes in forage fish abundance,  condition, and distribution may be affecting predator fish (Pacific   salmon, lake trout) condition and distribution in Lake Huron.   Changes in lake whitefish condition and distribution are affecting   commercial fishery harvests in Lakes Ontario, Huron, and Michigan.   In Lake Erie, low productivity and forage fish abundance may be   contributing to low harvests of walleye in the lake. In the  Chesapeake Bay, eutrophication and introduced bacteria have affected   Morone spp. fisheries, and the harmful parasite MSX that is   devastating oyster fisheries may be an introduced species.    The objectives of this project are to:  1) Improve our knowledge and understanding of food web processes and   dynamics and their relationship to environmental quality and living   resources in Great Lakes and coastal marine ecosystems with an   emphasis on fish ecology.  2) Apply this knowledge to better understand the causes, effects,   and solutions to problems such as eutrophication, toxic   contaminants, nonindigenous species invasions, habitat modification,   and climatic variation. A comparison across the Chesapeake Bay and   Great Lakes will provide further insight.    Accomplishments:  Analysis was completed on effects of hypoxia on bioenergetic growth   potential for striped bass and bay anchovy in the Chesapeake Bay,   and on foraging and distribution of yellow perch in Lake Erie. 

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Edward RutherfordPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Stephen B. BrandtResearcher
Associated with 2 projects
Agencies
NOAA $ 0.00USDEstimates

Funding 11 projects for a total of $502,508.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Landscape
Organism
Resource Management
Fisheries
Annex Numbers
Research & Development
Annex 17
Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
Effects of varying lake levels and relation to pollution sources, fate and effects
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
General
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
    Effects of varying lake levels and relation to pollution sources, fate and effects
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
    Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components

The Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Research Inventory is an
interactive, Internet-based, searchable database created as a tool to collect and disseminate
up-to-date information about research projects in the
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Region.