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A FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL TO CONTROL SEA LAMPREY THROUGHPHEROMONE-MEDIATED REDISTRIBUTION OF MIGRANTS IN THE GREAT LAKES

Two novel control approaches have been proposed for the use of the sea  lamprey migratory pheromone: 1) redistribution of migrants into areas  where they are increasingly vulnerable to capture or destruction; 2)  baiting traps to increase the efficiency of trapping operations. These  strategies are based on two hypothesized functions for three putative  migratory pheromone compounds (PADS, PSDS, PZS): 1) they  attract/retain migrating lampreys near river mouths arriving from  lakes or oceans; and/or, 2) once in rivers they guide migrants to  areas with suitable larval rearing habitat (and thereby into traps).  Although the whole larval odor does induce the second function in the  field (Wagner et al. 2  6), we have recently demonstrated PADS, PSDS,  and PZS are NOT responsible for this phenomenon. The first hypothesis  has never been tested. We are undertaking a four-year project to  ascertain the functional role of these compounds in attracting and  retaining migratory lampreys at river mouths and to develop a  full-scale control application for the migratory pheromone at the  lake-river interface.     Our purpose is to determine whether manipulation of the presence and  concentration of larval odorants in river plumes will facilitate sea  lamprey control. We will evaluate this goal by: (1) Establishing  whether and how PADS, PSDS, and PZS function by mediating the  approach, assessment, and retention of migratory phase lampreys at  river mouths during the spawning migration. (2) Identifying the  minimum set of pheromone compounds necessary to alter migratory  pathways and achieve control objectives. (3) Designing a novel control  strategy that combines the use of migratory pheromone compounds and  traditional control measures to maximize the removal and/or  destruction of migratory phase lamprey in large river systems. We  anticipate the design will be based on ?knocking out? rivers with  traditional control (lampricides) and activating a nearby stream with  synthesized pheromones to concentrate the regional migration into a  single stream (?unite and conquer?).

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Michael WagnerPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 6 projects
Roger BergstedtResearcher
Associated with 7 projects
Weiming LiResearcher
Associated with 6 projects
Michael TwoheyResearcher
Associated with 3 projects
Agencies
Great Lakes Fishery Commission $ 359,402.00USDEstimates

Funding 54 projects for a total of $5,089,137.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Organism
Physical/Chemical
Population
Impact of Pollutants
Exotic Species
Processes
Natural Ecological Processes
Resource Management
Fisheries
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Huron
State Province
Michigan
Quebec
Biology And Life History
Physiology and Behavior
Control And Mitigation
Chemical Measures
Prevention and Introduction
Determination of Preventive
Spread of Established ANS Populations
Mechanisms of Spread
Annex Numbers
Research & Development
Annex 17
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
General
Aquatic Nuisance Species
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats

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