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Human sewage in the Menomonee River: A systematic approach for detection, education, and elimination

Bacteria are a significant source of pollution in coastal waters,   and are top factors causing impairment to U.S. waters. Modeling   suggests that much of this contamination comes from non-point   sources (i.e. runoff from impervious surfaces, agriculture, lawns).   However, modeling done on the Menomonee River in Wauwatosa indicate   that fecal coliform levels are significantly higher than what is   expected based on storm water runoff alone. Testing of pathogens   throughout the Milwaukee River watershed repeatedly found that the   Menomonee River, and specifically Wauwatosa, has high frequencies of   Salmonella sp. and Cryptosporidium sp.    Collectively, these data indicate the high potential for sanitary   sewer connections to the storm sewer system, thus into streams and   rivers. To the extent that bacterial problems detected are due to   crumbling pipes and failing infrastructure, these flows may also be   contributing to high infiltration and inflow during storm events,   thus straining the sewage infrastructure's capacity and increasing   sewer overflows into rivers and Lake Michigan.    In this project, investigators will map and inspect all storm water   outfalls in an 8-mile stretch of the Menomonee River, and adjacent   stretches of Underwood Creek (Wisconsin) to detect human   contamination into these outfalls. Investigators will partner with   the Great Lakes WATER Institute, which will provide the bacterial   testing for samples collected, and assistance with mapping and   outreach. They will also work with municipal public works staff to   share results, and to develop outreach tools that can help municipal   leaders prioritize solutions, and help property owners understand   their role in helping to alleviate the dual problem of infiltration   of storm water into sanitary pipes, and exfiltration of sewage from   pipes into the environment.    Outcomes will be identification of human fecal contamination in   storm water outfalls within project area, better informed public and   officials, and reduction of bacterial loads in the Menomonee River   and Lake Michigan.    (non-point source pollution); (non-point pollution); (non-point   source); (MST); (microbial source tracking); (bacterial source   tracking); (BST); (beach closures); (beach closure); (beach   closing); (beach closings); (nonpoint source pollution); (nonpoint   source); (nonpoint)

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Lynn E. BroaddusPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Agencies
Friends of Milwaukee's Rivers $ 30,000.00USDActual

Funding 1 projects for a total of $30,000.00
Joyce Foundation $ 0.00USDActual

Funding 2 projects for a total of $160,000.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Laboratory Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Ecosystem
Landscape
State Province
Wisconsin
Resource Being Monitored
Emission / Release / Discharge / Waste Management
Human Health
Plankton / Microorganisms
Beneficial Use Impairment Assessments
Beach Closings
Annex Numbers
Control of Phosphorus
Pollution from Non-Point Sources
Research & Development
Annex 17
Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
Control technologies for treatment of municipal and industrial effluents/emissions
Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
General
Monitoring
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Control of Phosphorus
    Pollution from Non-Point Sources
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
    Control technologies for treatment of municipal and industrial effluents/emissions
    Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components

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