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Effects of non-indigenous invertebrates on the pelagic food web ofLake Michigan

Nonindigenous invertebrates are proliferating in Lake Michigan with  potential large scale ecosystem changes for the pelagic food web.    For  example, quagga mussels Dreissena bugensis were first found in Lake  Michigan in 1997 (Nalepa et al. 2  1) and by 2  6 had become abundant  in the offshore of Lake Michigan to depths of at least 85 m.  Quagga  mussels have replaced zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha in shallow  areas (< 5  m ), and are proliferating in colder, deeper areas (> 5   m) where zebra mussels were never found.  In the Great Lakes, zebra  mussels successfully altered pelagic pathways in the nearshore and  shifted productivity toward benthic pathways (Fahnenstiel et al.  1995).  Dreissenid mediated shifts in nutrients and production in the  nearshore region also affect offshore regions through a "nearshore  phosphorus shunt", where phosphorus is retained in nearshore areas at  the expense of offshore areas (Hecky et al. 2  4).  Not only will  mussels directly affect the food web through removal of   phytoplankton,  but also through their engineering activities (Vanderploeg et al.  2  2), most notably increasing light intensity.  The effects of the  rapid proliferation of quagga mussels between 2    and 2  3 is  suspected in some of the lower food web alterations currently  occurring in Lake Huron, including decreased zooplankton and forage  fish production.  Based on data collected in 2  7 in southern Lake  Michigan, changes in the pelagic food web including reduced  phytoplankton, zooplankton, and Mysis relicta appear to be occurring  as well.  Additionally, the mysid Hemimysis anomala, a new invasive  species, was found in Lake Michigan in 2  6.  Hemimysis could further  impact phytoplankton or zooplankton resources if it colonizes open  water habitats in the lake.  Bythotrephes longimanus and Cercopagis  pengoi are two invasive cladocerans that could also be altering  zooplankton populations in the lake.  Therefore, our goal is to  evaluate the status of the pelagic food web in Lake Michigan at sites  where we also have access to a historical data.  This project  encompasses 5 separate projects to help elicit the status and changes  in the pelagic food web of Lake Michigan.     (AIS); (aquatic invasive species); (ANS); (aquatic nuisance   species); (Lake Michigan)

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Ecosystem
Population
Impact of Pollutants
Exotic Species
Nutrients, Including Phosphorus
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Michigan
Biology And Life History
Population Dynamics
Ecosystem Effects
Food Web Structure
Annex Numbers
Control of Phosphorus
Research & Development
Annex 17
Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components
General
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Control of Phosphorus
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Impact of water quality and AIS on fish and wildlife populations and habitats
    Mass transfer of pollutants between GL Basin Ecosystem components

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