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Rates of Oxygen and Nutrient Exchange Between Sediments and Water in the Great Lakes

Regular ship-board monitoring of oxygen in the hypolimnion of Lake   Erie by the United States Environmental Protection Agency Great   Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) has been established to   monitor the status of the lake and determine if the water quality is   meeting the terms of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement   (GLWQA). Their annual water quality monitoring reveals that in spite   of reductions in phosphorus loadings over the past 2  years spring   total phosphorus concentrations are as high as in the 197 s, Lake   Erie bottom waters have gone anoxic in the late summer months and   the areal extent of the anoxia has increased during recent years   (Rockwell and Warren 2  3). These observations can be termed "The   Lake Erie Trophic Paradox". The traditional eutrophication model   predicts that a decrease in phosphorus loading will result in a   decrease in phosphorus concentration which will result in a decrease   in algal production (chlorophyll) which will result in less   hypolimnion oxygen depletion. This is exactly what was observed in   Lake Erie during the 197 -199  time period. However, since then   these systems all appear to be disconnected. Phosphorus loadings   have remained at about the target loadings of 11,    metric   tons/year, phosphorus concentrations have increased to levels as   high as in the 197 s while chlorophyll concentrations have dropped   to the lowest values observed and oxygen depletion rates appear to   have increased. These findings indicate that there is a need to   better understand nutrient cycling and oxygen depletion in Lake   Erie.     This project seeks to obtain an accurate, calibrated description of   the SOD and sediment-water nutrient exchange in Lake Erie. This   will be accomplished by obtaining measurements of SOD and nutrient   exchange by three techniques: whole core incubations, calculations   using microelectrode and pore water profiles, and from plug flow-  through reactor measurements.    (sediment); (sediments); (Lake Erie); (nutrients); (nutrient);   (hypoxia); (hypoxic conditions); (eutrophication); (oxygen);   (phosphorous); (phosphorous loading); (loading); (loadings);   (loadings determination); (algal bloom); (algal blooms)

Status
In progress
Type
Project
Start Date
End Date
Researchers
Gerald MatisoffPrincipal Investigator
Associated with 1 projects
Agencies
State of Ohio $ 0.00USDEstimates

Funding 8 projects for a total of $223,131.00

Funding 15 projects for a total of $599,045.00
Scope of Study
Field Investigation
Scale of Phenomena
Biochemical
Landscape
Physical/Chemical
Impact of Pollutants
Nutrients, Including Phosphorus
Land Use and Habitat
Wetlands
Lake Basin Connecting Channels
Lake Erie
Out of Basin
State Province
Ohio
Purpose of Project
Loadings Determination
Region Being Monitored
Coastal Wetlands
Near and OpenShore Waters
Nearshore Terrestrial
Resource Being Monitored
Bottom Sediment
Human Health
Suspended Sediments
Program Drivers
Canada - U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement
Beneficial Use Impairment Assessments
Beach Closings
Eutrophication or Undesirable Algae
Annex Numbers
Contaminated Sediment
Control of Phosphorus
Research & Development
Annex 17
Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
Relationship of contaminated sediments on ecosystem health
General
Monitoring
Annex
  • Annex Numbers
    Annex Numbers
    Contaminated Sediment
    Control of Phosphorus
    Research & Development
  • Annex 17
    Annex 17
    Cause-effect inter-relationships of productivity and ecotoxicity
    Relationship of contaminated sediments on ecosystem health

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