The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Research Inventory

The Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Research Inventory is an interactive, Internet-based, searchable database created as a tool to collect and disseminate up-to-date information about research projects in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Region. The Research Inventory allows Great Lakes researchers to identify similar studies, network, share experiences and increase efficiency. It enables managers to examine the impact of research, the interrelationships between research disciplines, the adequacy of research related to government agreements and to link research to policy questions.

Recently Added Projects

  • AN EVALUATION OF STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ESTIMATING ABUNDANCES OF ADULT SEA LAMPREY FROM STRATIFIED MARK RECAPTURE DATA

    September 1, 2014 to August 31, 2015In ProgressProject

    We propose to examine the performance of alternative statistical methods that could be applied to estimate abundance and trapping efficiency for the adult stage of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Mark-recapture methods involving trapping are an integral part of the sea lamprey control program. They are used to estimate abundances of adults in specific tributaries, predict abundances across a lake, and quantify trapping efficiency.

  • Demonstration of the photodegradation of lampricides to form benign products during in situ dosing

    July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015In ProgressProject

    Many halogenated aromatic compounds, including the two lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2’,5-dichloro-4’nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide), undergo photodegradation. Although photodegradation can result in the loss of lampricide efficacy during dosing events, it also can reduce the persistence of the compounds after the treatment period. This research project aims to establish the role of photodegradation in the fate and lifetime of both lampricides in aquatic environments.

  • REFINEMENT OF A NEW TRAPPING TOOL FOR MIGRATING ADULT SEA LAMPREY

    April 30, 2014 to April 30, 2016In ProgressProject

    Previous research has shown that capture rate of adult migrating sea lampreys in eel-ladder-style traps (ELST) was similar to traditional funnel traps with no fin-fish bycatch typical of funnel traps and 100% trap retention, at multiple trapping locations. Additionally, ELST used in conjunction with current funnel trap operations can sort lamprey from finfish greatly reducing required labor while increasing safety for trap operators.

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